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Tuesday, 03 June 2014 00:00

Egyptian Mau Breeders

EGYPTIAN MAU

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Egyptian Mau of the Year
Best Egyptian Mau of the Year
QGC Celestialspots Milky Way
BLACK SILVER SPOTTED TABBY
Best Egyptian Mau Kitten of the Year
Best Egyptian Mau Kitten of the Year
Iridium Soul Flux
Black Silver Spotted Tabby
Best Egyptian Mau Alter of the Year
Best Egyptian Mau Alter of the Year
RW SGCA Amaure Mulan Rouge
Black Silver Spotted Tabby
Online Breeder Logo

TICA Breeders

The breeders below are all members of TICA's Online Breeders. When you visit their cattery website, look for the TICA Online Breeders logo.

The breeders you find listed here are TICA members who have signed the TICA Code of Ethics. Since we are a large association we do not have the resources to visit each of the listed catteries before linking to their website. Please read our information about Adopting a Cat or Kitten before visiting a breeder.

See your cattery listed here or renew your current listing! Find out how.

Have you registered your cattery name? Check if it is available!

Egyptian Mau Breeders

Canada - Ontario

JEWELSNILE

DISCLAIMER
The International Cat Association, Inc.® (TICA®) Does Not Endorse any of the breeders, products, or services on this page unless otherwise noted. Please read our Disclaimers.
Monday, 02 June 2014 18:00

Devon Rex-Introduction

Devon Rex

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Devon Rex of the Year
Best Devon Rex of the Year
RW SGC Jobara Princssbride of Curlydoll/CF
Black Silver Mackerel Tabby
Best Devon Rex Kitten of the Year
Best Devon Rex Kitten of the Year
Txelfkatz Elfis Presley
Black/White
Best Devon Rex Alter of the Year
Best Devon Rex Alter of the Year
SGCA Steadham Finneus
Brown (Black) Mackerel Tabby/White

General Description

Devon Rex are the pixies of the cat fancy with their impish looks and mischievous personalities. The Devon Rex have large low set ears and big impish eyes set in a head with a short muzzle and high cheekbones. It is a small to medium sized cat with a muscular body covered with a short, velvety soft coat that ripples with waves. They are often described as resembling the Gremlins from the film Star Wars while the waif-like tousled curls of their coats are reminiscent of Little Orphan Annie's tousled mop.

History

Buckfastleigh, Devon, England is the ancestral home of the Devon Rex where a feral tom cat with a curly coat lived in an abandoned tin mine. In 1960, a tortie & white stray adopted by Miss Beryl Cox had a litter of kittens sired by the feral tom. One of the kittens was a brownish-black male with a coat just like his sire's. Miss Cox kept the kitten and named him Kirlee. Aware of Kallibunker (the first Cornish Rex) and the work to preserve that new gene, she wrote to Brian Sterling-Webb thinking her Kirlee could contribute to that program. However it turned out that the gene creating Kirlee's curly coat was different to the one producing Kallibunker's marcelled waves. There were a number of differences in the coat between Kirlee and the CR. While Kalli had whiskers that were bent and curled, the gene from Devon resulted in missing or stubby whiskers. Kirlee had tight curls but not as uniform as those of Kallibunker giving them a windblown appearance. And Kirlee had huge, low-set ears giving his head a pixie-like look that was accentuated by the large, inquisitive eyes and short nose.

Breeders started developing a program to conserve the gene discovered in Devon too. The gene discovered in Cornwall was designated Gene 1 and that discovered in Devon Gene 2. Sterling-Webb (Briarry) now worked to conserve this gene as well along with Mrs. Agnes Watts (Du-Bu) and Mrs. Madge Shrouder (Hassan). All Devon Rex trace their ancestry back to Kirlee who was sadly killed in a car accident in 1970.

Personality

Devon Rex are intelligent, mischievous and highly active. They are very playful and want to be involved in everything - and they are powerful jumpers no spot goes unexplored! Expect to find them perching on the top of doors or climbing to some previously unexplored spot. Although they are interested in everything going on around them, Devons are very people-oriented and prefer to share their investigations with you so expect their company no matter what you are doing. They will perch on your shoulder watching you make supper (food is another of their favorite things!), curl in your lap while you read a book, and snuggle under the covers to sleep with you at night. They aren't particularly talkative but do chirp when they feel they absolutely need you to look at something that has caught their interest. These busy little pixies work well in an active household as they thrive on company but should not be left alone for long periods as they can become destructive if they get bored. They are great with children and get along well with other family pets.

Traits

Devon Rex are well-muscled, mid-sized cats weighing on average from six to nine pounds, with males being heavier than females. Their soft, short, curly coats vary from cat to cat - the ideal show coat is an even, full coat of loose curls but individual cats will have coats ranging from a tousled mop of curls to a thin suede-like coat. Some cats may also have almost bare patches as well. The coats often vary over the life of the cat and when molting the coat will often break off so no curl is apparent until the new coat grows back. Kittens often go through this stage. The whiskers and eyebrows are also short and crinkled like the coat.

One of the startling things when you pick up a Devon is how warm they are to the touch - they feel like soft hot water bottles and are ideal to snuggle up to in winter. They have the same body temperature as other cats but their coat does not provide as much insulation and so they feel warmer. They also love heat and will be found basking in the windows or seeking other sources of heat like the top of the television.

Contrary to popular opinion, Devon Rex do shed just like all other cats however the structure of the coat makes the shedding less obtrusive than in some other breeds. For some reason, there is a perception that the Devon Rex is hypo-allergenic however they do produce allergens like every other cat. Some people with allergies to cats are able to tolerate Devons but others are not depending on their personal allergies. If you are allergic and are considering a Devon, you should make arrangements to spend some time in the company of a Devon before acquiring one. Visit with one and wait at least 24 hours to see if they do elicit an allergic reaction and ideally visit more than once. Pixie-like in appearance, the Devon Rex is a small- to medium-sized cat that retains the appearance of Kirlee, the foundation cat. Its sturdy body is muscular, with hind legs longer than the forelegs. It has a modified wedge shaped head with large, inquisitive eyes, broad cheekbones, strong chin and a short muzzle. The ears are large and low set. The compact, supple body is covered with loose waves and curls. These little minxes are friendly, intelligent, curious companions and will make a playful addition to your household.

Sunday, 01 June 2014 00:00

American Curl Breeders

AMERICAN CURL

Accepted for Championship in TICA in May 1988

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best American Curl of the Year
Best American Curl of the Year
SGC Americurlzz Catchew O Liberty
Black Silver Classic Torbie/White
Best American Curl Kitten of the Year
Best American Curl Kitten of the Year
Americurlzz Catchew O Liberty
Black Silver Classic Torbie/White
Best American Curl Alter of the Year
Best American Curl Alter of the Year
Shiningcurl Volgograd
Brown (Black) Classic Tabby/White
Online Breeder Logo

TICA Breeders

The breeders below are all members of TICA's Online Breeders. When you visit their cattery website, look for the TICA Online Breeders logo.

The breeders you find listed here are TICA members who have signed the TICA Code of Ethics. Since we are a large association we do not have the resources to visit each of the listed catteries before linking to their website. Please read our information about Adopting a Cat or Kitten before visiting a breeder.

See your cattery listed here or renew your current listing! Find out how.

Have you registered your cattery name? Check if it is available!

American Curl Breeders

USA - California

CURLESSENCE

CURLNIQUES

USA - Wisconsin

SHADYNOOK

DISCLAIMER
The International Cat Association, Inc.® (TICA®) Does Not Endorse any of the breeders, products, or services on this page unless otherwise noted. Please read our Disclaimers.
Monday, 02 June 2014 00:00

American Bobtail SH Breeders

AMERICAN BOBTAIL SHORTHAIR

Accepted for Championship in TICA in May 2002

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best American Bobtail Shorthair of the Year
Best American Bobtail Shorthair of the Year
CH Magicbobs Yukon Red of Deercreek
Red Mackerel Tabby
Best American Bobtail Shorthair Kitten of the Year
Best American Bobtail Shorthair Kitten of the Year
Magicbobs Gum Drop
Blue Classic Torbie
Best American Bobtail Shorthair Alter of the Year
Best American Bobtail Shorthair Alter of the Year
RW SGCA Magicbobs Chasing My Blues Away
Blue Spotted Tabby
Online Breeder Logo

TICA Breeders

The breeders below are all members of TICA's Online Breeders. When you visit their cattery website, look for the TICA Online Breeders logo.

The breeders you find listed here are TICA members who have signed the TICA Code of Ethics. Since we are a large association we do not have the resources to visit each of the listed catteries before linking to their website. Please read our information about Adopting a Cat or Kitten before visiting a breeder.

See your cattery listed here or renew your current listing! Find out how.

Have you registered your cattery name? Check if it is available!

American Bobtail Shorthair Breeders

There are no current listings. Be the first to advertise your cattery here!

Please fill out the Online Breeder Listing Form.

DISCLAIMER
The International Cat Association, Inc.® (TICA®) Does Not Endorse any of the breeders, products, or services on this page unless otherwise noted. Please read our Disclaimers.
Sunday, 01 June 2014 18:00

Cymric-Introduction

Cymric

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Cymric of the Year
Best Cymric of the Year
QGC Caaleigh Snowberry
White
Best Cymric Kitten of the Year
Best Cymric Kitten of the Year
Branbarrel Just Adele
Black Silver Mackerel Tabby
Best Cymric Alter of the Year
Best Cymric Alter of the Year
IW SGC Minusdetails Reddy For Action
Red Classic Tabby/White

General Description

The mature Manx with all its rounded contours reminds one of a bowling ball. It is a round, heavy cat of medium size. Its primary feature is its lack of a tail. Not all kittens are born tailless. The ideal Manx has a rounded rump with just a dimple where the tail would have been however some have short stubby tails and some are born with full length tails. But the intelligent Manx is far more than just a cat without a tail! Its hind legs are long than the front legs so the rump is raised in the air. In days gone by, some people thought they saw a hopping gait and this, combined with the longer hind legs and lack of tail, gave rise to the moniker of 'bunny cat'. These charming cats claim an origin from the Isle of Man and come in two coat lengths: the shorthair known as the Manx and the longhair known as the Cymric.

History

Several colorful tales surround the origin of the Manx including the one where Noah cut off its tail as he closed the Ark door as the rain began. The records show the breed originated on the Isle of Man. The first cats may have come from nearby England and Wales or they may have come from further afield however the initial population arrived by ship on the Manx shores. At some point, a mutation occurred so kittens were born without the vertebrae of a normal tail. The first picture of one appears in a painting from 1810 however linguistic evidence suggests an earlier date around 1750 as the English word 'stubbin' is used for the Manx whereas prior to 1750 only the Manx language was used. A small island, the Isle of Man is an isolated area so inbreeding of the island population resulted in the lack of a tail becoming a common trait. Manx were among the original breeds at the dawn of the cat fancy in the late 1800s as we find them in the show records from that era. Tailless longhairs also appeared on the Isle of Man, however they did not achieve mainstream recognition until later. Today, the longhair is known as the Cymric with an identical standard to the Manx. TICA recognized both the Cymric and the Manx for championship competition in June 1979.

Personality

These gentle cats are generally playful and their powerful hindquarters make them excellent jumpers able to get to the highest corner to investigate something that has attracted their interest. They are intelligent cats quickly learning how to use their paws to turn a door handle to get to a room containing something they want. Manx and Cymrics quickly learn to retrieve and sometimes bury their toys like a dog. While they have a relatively quiet voice, they can be quite talkative and often use a unique trilling sound. They are people-oriented cats who form strong bonds with their families. They get on with children and other pets when properly introduced. These even-tempered, calm cats have a lot of affection to share and prefer not be on their own for long periods of time.

Traits

Together, the Manx and the Cymric comprise the Manx breed group. They differ only in coat length with the shorthairs known as Manx and the longhairs as Cymrics. They come in all traditional colors and patterns often with bold colors and dramatic markings. They have a thick coat that gives a padded feel to the body and adds to the rounded look. The shorthaired Manx has a double coat and the somewhat hard guard hairs tend to have a gloss appearance. The longhaired Cymric has a silky texture to the plush, medium-length coat with fluffy breeches and neck ruff.

While lack of a tail is the immediately obvious features of these breeds, they are also known for the roundness. These medium-sized cats have short, rounded bodies with a deep flank to the strong hindquarters, arched back and a round head with round cheeks. In fact, everything about these cats is round, making them resemble bowling balls! The eyes are also round but set on a slight tilt and the ear set resembles the cradle of a rocking chair giving the cats a sweet expression. Manx/Cymrics take 5 years to reach their full maturity and then males will weigh 10-12 pounds on average and the female 8-10 pounds.

While the lack of tail is the most striking characteristic, it is important to keep in mind that the nerve endings are still present but are not protected so care should be taken when handling the area where the tail would have been or the stubby tails. Pressure in this area can cause the cat pain. Children should be cautioned to be careful when petting the cat and not to poke at the missing tail area. Also, because of the structure of the cat, the cat's hindquarters should always be supported when it is being picked up or carried to ensure there is no additional pressure on the spine.

Monday, 02 June 2014 00:00

Cornish Rex-Introduction

Cornish Rex

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Cornish Rex of the Year
Best Cornish Rex of the Year
RW SGC Rio Twisted Dream of Madawaska
Black
Best Cornish Rex Kitten of the Year
Best Cornish Rex Kitten of the Year
Rexkwizit Butler
Black/White
Best Cornish Rex Alter of the Year
Best Cornish Rex Alter of the Year
IW SGCA Rextasy Im A Knockout of Pipkin
Red Mackerel Tabby/White

General Description

The energetic and elegant Cornish Rex bounces through life and into your heart with undaunted enthusiasm. They are a natural breed originating from a mutation first recognized in England. Often referred to as the Greyhound of the cat world because of their long legged body complete with tuck-up, the Cornish Rex is easily recognizable by its wavy marceled coat. These curls go from their eyebrows to their whiskers and all over their body. There is NO hypo-allergenic cat, but the Cornish is considered a good choice for people with allergies as they do not seem to aggravate them as much as other cats. Their large tall ears and soft, big oval eyes blend into their egg-shaped head giving them a wonderfully expressive appearance. Smart, social cats, they know their place...right in the middle of everything!

History

The story of the Cornish Rex begins in Bodmin Moor, Cornwall. On July 21, 1950 a tortoiseshell cat named Serena, owned by Mrs. Nina Ennismore gave birth to a litter of five kittens. One red & white coloured kitten in this litter had an unusual curly coat. The kitten was named Kallibunker (Kalli) and was to become the founder of the Cornish Rex breed. Nina's veterinarian suggested she contact geneticist A C Jude. He advised she mate Kallibunker back to his mother. This breeding produced three kittens. One was a straight coated female the other two curly coated males. Sadly, one male died at 7 months of age, the second male named Poldhu (along with Kallibunker) went on to sire further litters. Due to the gene pool being very small in the 1950s-1960s the Cornish Rex was an endangered breed. They were out crossed to domestics as well as Siamese, Russian Blues, American Shorthairs, British Shorthairs and Havana Browns to create great genetic diversity and a strong, healthy foundation for the breed. In 1956, Life magazine published an article on the Cornish Rex that generated a lot of attention worldwide. The following year Frances Blancheri of California imported Lamorna Cove. She was pregnant by her father Poldhu at the time. She went on to have a litter of 4 kittens...the start of the Cornish Breed in North America.

Personality

The Cornish Rex has an outstanding enthusiastic personality. They are highly social cats, not at all reserved, liking to be right in the middle of everything and thrive on attention. They are extremely intelligent, very acrobatic & clownish, and retain their kitten-like personalities throughout their adult life. They are a very lively, energetic breed that loves to play and will entertain themselves for hours. One of their favorite games is Fetch, retrieving toys like a dog, and if no one is available...they will even throw the toy for themselves with their little paws that they use like hands. Cornish Rex love attention and make wonderful pets, although can be demanding at times. They do not like to be alone for long periods so it is a good idea for them to have a companion if the family works long hours. The Cornish is definitely a lap cat and ANY lap will do, they get along well with other animals and make an ideal children's pet. They are usually quiet, but can express themselves quite well with a pat on the cheek, a kiss on the cheek or a turned back & flip of the tail.

Traits

The Cornish Rex has a racy slender, body which stands tall on its legs. Do not be fooled though, while these cats appear fine boned and elegant they are actually hard bodied and muscular for all their dainty appearance. They have a natural arch to their back that matches a tuck-up to their waist that flows into a long tapering tail. The Cornish have dainty oval paws and tend to walk high on their nimble toes. Their head is often said to look like an egg on its side with high cheekbones. They have tall ears that sit high on their head, but not so high as to give it a donkey-like look. Cornish Rex have oval expressive eyes with a slight upward slant and a patrician roman nose.

Of course, the most unique feature of the Cornish Rex is their coat. Unlike most cats, Cornish coats do not have guard hairs and the hair lays in marcel waves that can be tight or loose--they are often compared to a washboard in appearance and to Chenille in touch with its incredibly soft and silky texture. The curls even extend to their whiskers, which are foreshortened and curled. They require little grooming, although they have a tendency to get greasy ears and toes. Females, on an average, weigh 5-7 pounds while males weigh 8-10 pounds. They come in all colors and patterns from pointed to solid to tabbies, with or without white. Their bodies often appear to be warmer to the touch, then the average cat and actually have a slightly higher than normal temperature. They love warm places, be it a heat vent, sunspot, warm lap or under the blankets in bed.

Sunday, 01 June 2014 18:00

Chausie-Introduction

Chausie

Accepted for Championship in TICA in May 2013

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Chausie of the Year
Best Chausie of the Year
RW TGC Halestone Jaime Lannister
Brown (Black) Ticked Tabby
Best Chausie Kitten of the Year
Best Chausie Kitten of the Year
Awilddream Desert Song
Brown (Black) Ticked Tabby
Best Chausie Alter of the Year
Best Chausie Alter of the Year
LA SGCA Tasurt Junga
Black Grizzled Ticked Tabby

General Description

The breed name, Chausie (pronounced chow-see), is actually derived from the Latin name for the Jungle Cat, felis chaus. The Jungle Cat is a distinct species of cat that dwells from the Nile Valley to the Caspian Sea. The Jungle Cat also is normally found in South Asia as far Vietnam.

The Chausie is a long legged, tall, statuesque cat that it is built for running and jumping. Like the Jungle Cat, the Chausie has a body type like that of an Olympic athlete. With an ectomorphic body type, Chausies are built with a limberness that lends a sense of grace and balance. The Chausie has a deep chest which enables them to breathe deeply so they seem to have a limitless source of energy. Like the Jungle Cat, Chausies have large, upright, preferably tufted ears. The Chausie also has a long sloping forehead and muzzle with a slightly shortened tail. Their eyes are flattened on the top with a slightly rounded bottom. Their cheekbones are exotically slanted and their temperament is predominantly domestic. Being good natured, loyal, highly intelligent, and highly trainable the Chausie is a curious playful cat that requires stimulation and companionship.

History

The Jungle Cat has an extensive history dating back to the time of the ancient Egyptians. These cats were domesticated by the Egyptians because of their easy going temperaments and adept hunting skills. Mummified Jungle Cats have been discovered in Egyptian tombs attesting to the high regard in which they were held. These magnificent cats were often mummified with their owners in formal funeral rights to accompany them in the afterlife. Some say the statues of the Goddess Bastet were modeled after the Jungle Cat and the resemblance is certainly seen in her long slender body, svelte appearance, and large ears.

Occasionally the Jungle Cat mated with domestic cats, and there have been numerous reports of hybrids from across North America to Southeast Asia, including India dating back centuries. However, the first recorded breeding of a Jungle Cat and a domestic cat was recorded in 1990. After breeders began working together, the Chausie was awarded foundation registration status in 1995 with The International Cat Association (TICA). Due to the effort of breeders and their work, the Chausie was given Championship status starting May 1, 2013.

Personality

Being highly athletic and active, the Chausie is almost constantly in motion while interacting with their humans. These domestic cats are good natured and affectionate that love to play. They often develop deep bonds with their owners. Sociable in nature, Chausies love to play fetch and will often walk on a leash. This playful demeanor often lasts well into adulthood making these domestic cats intriguing companions. Due to their intelligence, Chausies need stimulation and interaction with their owners, otherwise they may not do well if left alone for long periods of time.

Traits

Bred to retain their appearance to the Jungle Cat, this domestic feline is a short haired medium to large sized cat that is tall and long bodied. The Chausie has a rectangular torso, deep chest, and flat sides. The Chausie has long, angular, and high set cheekbones which are balanced out by the long muzzle. Their ears are tall, large, and set at a slightly outward angle on top of the head about two finger widths apart from the inside basis. Sometimes the top of the ears have tufts, which enhances the Chausie's slightly cougarish appearance.

There are three color-patterns that the Chausie displays. They are: brown-ticked tabby, solid black, and grizzled tabby. The brown-ticked tabby has barring on the inside of the front legs and down to the hock on the hind legs. Unique to this domestic cat, the grizzled tabby pattern is acquired from breed's ancestor, the Jungle Cat. The hair shaft is banded with a lighter coloration at the skin, akin to mouse coat, a black base coat, and alternating light bands with a black tip.

Our History in TICA

Given foundation registry status in 1995, Chausie breeders worked their way through the New Breed Class from May 2001 to April 2013. Due to the many efforts of Chausie breeders, as of May 1, 2013 the Chausie is the newest Championship breed in TICA.

Monday, 02 June 2014 00:00

Chartreux-Introduction

Chartreux

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Chartreux of the Year
Best Chartreux of the Year
RW SGC Carchet Jeunnet
Blue
Best Chartreux Kitten of the Year
Best Chartreux Kitten of the Year
IW Carchet Marionette
Blue
Best Chartreux Alter of the Year
Best Chartreux Alter of the Year
Lesplushes Joyeux Copain
Blue

General Description

The Chartreux is an old breed that is a balance of contrasts. With its sturdy, robust body and fine-boned legs, the Chartreux is often described as a "potato on toothpicks". It is one of the few breeds to come in blue only and its medium length coat has a woolly texture to it. It has a hard top-coat which is water-repellent and a soft, dense undercoat to keep it warm. The rounded head tapers towards the muzzle creating a smile and the medium-sized ears are set high on the head. But the eyes are one of the first features to leap out at you—the large orange eyes light up the whole face.

History

Reputed to be great mousers, references to Chartreux cats are found in French literature as early as the 16th century. There are 2 possible ways the Chartreux may have received its name. The first, as a companion to the Carthusian monks protecting the grain stores for the monastery and perhaps the ingredients for the famous Charteuse liqueur. The second, as a cat with a coat similar to a well-known Spanish wool from the 18th century. There are no records in the monastery that refer to the cats however the term Chartreux for these cats was being used as early as the 17th century which predates the Spanish wool and appears to be more connected with the monastery. French literature has references to the Charteux cat though the 1880s and it is known considered the national cat of France. As with many other breeds, the Chartreux suffered through WWII and after the war other breeds were introduced to help preserve a solid genetic base. In the case of the Charteux, blue British Shorthairs and Persians were used but breeders stayed focused on preserving the overall look of the cat.

Personality

These are cats that want their feet firmly on the ground. While playful and intelligent, these engaging cats are not one for hi-jinks flying through the air. They have quiet voices and sometimes seem to chirp to each other and to their owners. While they are somewhat reserved, these are calm placid cats that are devoted to their owners. They like to climb and have a reputation of being great hunters—these aspects of their personality may be directly connected to their earlier role of hunters.

Traits

These cats have a solid robust body often referred to as "primitive". They are a study of contrasts: heavy body supported by medium-fine legs; medium erect ears over very large orange eyes lighting up the face; a rounded top-head narrowing to a tapered muzzle with the corners pulled upward to give the cat a smiling expression; a thick, dense coat with a hard, water-repellent outer layer and a soft, warm undercoat. They are solid, muscular cats and mature adults weigh from 12-16 pounds.

Monday, 02 June 2014 00:00

Burmese-Introduction

Burmese

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Burmese of the Year
Best Burmese of the Year
LA SGC Securitazz Jewlzgalore
Sable
Best Burmese Kitten of the Year
Best Burmese Kitten of the Year
Katsnklamms Mocha Latte
Chocolate Sepia Tortie
Best Burmese Alter of the Year
Best Burmese Alter of the Year
IW SGCA Suigeneris Sundance of Ringapurr/CF
Chocolate Sepia

General Description

The seal sepia, or sable, Burmese with its rich, short, glossy dark brown coat and deep gold eyes springs to mind when one thinks Burmese. But these compact bundles bring joy and love to your world as they give you complete and unconditional devotion. They are extremely people-oriented and tolerant cats that are an ideal pet for the whole family, including younger children. The Burmese will happily join in games and play the role of living doll. While the sable Burmese is the original color, the Burmese now comes in a variety of other colors from a warm blue to a pinky-grey lilac to a soft chocolate and even combines these colors with red and cream. Imagine a lilac tortoiseshell-a combination of soft pinks mingled with rich cream color of Devonshire clotted cream! These newer colors are rapidly becoming as popular as the original sable brown.

History

The Burmese we know it today, was developed in America from a single cat: Wong Mau. In 1930 a sailor brought Wong Mau from the Orient and gave her to Dr. Joseph G. Thompson of San Francisco. She was described as "a rather small cat, fine boned, but with a more compact body than that of a Siamese, with shorter tail, a rounded, short-muzzled head, with greater width between rounded eyes." She was walnut-brown in color, with darker brown points. Many breeders considered her a dark Siamese but Dr Thomson thought she was distinctly different. He established a program to isolate and reproduce her distinguishing traits. In 1932 Wong Mau was bred to Tai Mau, a Seal Point Siamese, and had kittens of two colors: some like Siamese kittens and others brown kittens with darker points like Wong Mau. Bred to her son, Yen Yen Mau, Wong Mau's kittens contained 3 colors: some like Siamese kittens, brown kittens like Wong Mau, and some dark brown kittens. The dark brown offspring founded the Burmese breed. It is now accepted that Wong Mau was actually a Siamese x Burmese hybrid.

On Mar 29 1955, the first blue Burmese kitten, Sealcoat Blue Surprise, was born in England. Cats other than sable had appeared earlier, but most Burmese breeders chose to breed only the sable cats. It is now believed that Wong Mau also carried the genes for dilution and chocolate that resulted in the appearance of chocolate, blue and lilac kittens. The red factor was added later in Europe. The Burmese was one of the original breeds TICA recognized in June 1979.

Personality

Burmese are extremely sweet-natured, people-oriented cats who love to curl up on any available lap. They are playful cats and their playful nature extends to joining the games of the youngest family members, easily tolerating being dressed up in doll's clothes and carried around like a living doll. They are very social cats that thrive on company and will be lonely if there is no-one home with them. They are an ideal family pet but if your busy household means they will be alone for long periods of time, you might want to consider two so they will be company for each other.

Traits

Burmese come in a range of solid and tortoiseshell colors: rich, dark sable brown; a medium, warm blue; a warm, honey beige chocolate with pink or fawn tints; a lovely lilac that ranges in tone from a bright pinkish grey to a silvery platinum with pink tints; reds of a light, golden apricot with melon-orange overtones; rich, warm deep creams with hints of apricot; and the soft mingling of red or cream with sable, chocolate, blue or lilac found in the tortoiseshells. All with seductive gold eyes glowing with their love for you. In young cats, the points will be darker but as the cat gets older and the coat matures the body color becomes deeper and richer until there is only a very slight difference between it and the color on the legs, head and tail.

The Burmese is a medium-sized, compact cat with a strong, well-muscled body making it surprisingly heavy for its size. It has a short, silky, single coat that hugs the muscular body and is a joy to stroke. The Burmese is a sturdy cat like a little bulldog with females being smaller than the males. The head is rounded and its large, innocent-looking gold eyes give it a sweet expression.

Their satin-like coats require little maintenance. A weekly grooming with a rubber brush to remove loose hairs will polish the coat to a high gloss. The oils from your hand petting and stroking the coat help maintain its balance and a quick wipe with a chamois will give that final finishing touch.

The Burmese has a soft, soft sweet voice and will enjoy a conversation with you if encouraged. These charming cats with rich colors, big gold eyes, and velvet paws will win your heart while you wonder how you ever lived without one in your life.

Sunday, 01 June 2014 12:00

American Bobtail Breeders

AMERICAN BOBTAIL

Accepted for Championship in TICA in May 2002

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best American Bobtail of the Year
Best American Bobtail of the Year
RW DGC Magicbobs Double Trouble
Brown (Black) Classic Tabby
Best American Bobtail Kitten of the Year
Best American Bobtail Kitten of the Year
Magicbobs Bewitched
Blue Silver Classic Tabby
Best American Bobtail Alter of the Year
Best American Bobtail Alter of the Year
RW SGCA Attitudeacres Missy Mountain
Brown (Black) Spotted Tabby
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TICA Breeders

The breeders below are all members of TICA's Online Breeders. When you visit their cattery website, look for the TICA Online Breeders logo.

The breeders you find listed here are TICA members who have signed the TICA Code of Ethics. Since we are a large association we do not have the resources to visit each of the listed catteries before linking to their website. Please read our information about Adopting a Cat or Kitten before visiting a breeder.

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American Bobtail Breeders

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The International Cat Association, Inc.® (TICA®) Does Not Endorse any of the breeders, products, or services on this page unless otherwise noted. Please read our Disclaimers.