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American bobtail shorthair

Accepted for Championship in TICA in May 2002

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best American Bobtail Shorthair of the Year
Best American Bobtail Shorthair of the Year
CH Magicbobs Yukon Red of Deercreek
Red Mackerel Tabby
Best American Bobtail Shorthair Kitten of the Year
Best American Bobtail Shorthair Kitten of the Year
Magicbobs Gum Drop
Blue Classic Torbie
Best American Bobtail Shorthair Alter of the Year
Best American Bobtail Shorthair Alter of the Year
RW SGCA Magicbobs Chasing My Blues Away
Blue Spotted Tabby

General Description

Reminiscent of the wild cats, the American Bobtail is a medium-large to large, naturally occurring short-tailed cat, native to North America. It is a well-muscled, solid cat with the power and grace of an athlete. It has the gaze of the hunter and the rolling gait that, along with its naturally bobbed tail, give it the resemblance to the wild cats but with the loving affection and intelligence of the domestic cat. No two tails are identical so they are truly the hallmark of the individual and are proudly held above the back when the cat is alert, often wagging to express the cat's mood. Developed by nature to survive in its native environment, the American Bobtail has above average intelligence and is a breed of moderation rather than extremes taking up to 3 years to reach full maturity.

History

Although the Bobtail has been in America for many generations, the true development of the breed began in the late 1960's. Every breeder of the American Bobtail has heard the story of Yodi, the patriarch of the breed. John and Brenda Sanders, a young couple, were vacationing in the southwest. They were driving through an Indian Reservation in Arizona when they discovered a brown tabby kitten with a short tail and decided to take their new pet home to Iowa. When Yodi became of age, he romanced the couple's female cat, Mishi, a non-pedigreed domestic color point. The resulting kittens inherited Yodi's unusual short tail. The kittens soon caught the eye of family friends, Mindy Shultz and Charlotte Bentley, who saw the possibility of a new breed of felines. Using several of these bobtailed kittens and outcrossing to a longhaired color point, they produced the first true American Bobtails.

In 1989, TICA recognized the American Bobtail as a naturally occurring breed of cat. The foundation stock of this breed comes from feral cats possessing a natural short tail from different regions of the United States and Canada. Most breeders no longer use feral bobtailed cats in their breeding programs.

Personality

The American Bobtail is a great family pet who attaches itself to the whole family, not just one person. The breed gets along with children as well as other pets, including the family dog. They want to be with the family rather than being alone. They have a subtle personality which is affectionate and loving rather than demanding or in your face. Most are moderately active without being either a "couch potato" or a "perpetual motion" machine. They can easily be taught to "walk" on a leash and play fetch.

Traits

The American Bobtail comes in any color and pattern. This means that they can be any pattern in black, brown, chocolate, cinnamon, blue, lilac, fawn, red, and cream, with or without white. This wonderful variety of colors and patterns comes in two (2) hair lengths: short and medium-long. The short hair is plush and reminds people of a rabbit pelt. The longer one is easy to keep with minimal combing.

The weight of males usually ranges between 12-16 lbs while females are 7-11 lbs. The weight should come from the cat being well-muscled and having substantial, large boning, rather than being overweight.

One of the most unusual traits is the cat's shortened tail. The desired length of the tail should be a minimum one inch and a maximum not longer than the hock. The tail mutation gene is not a controllable gene resulting in the different tail lengths of each kitten in the litter.

Friday, 30 May 2014 18:00

American Bobtail-Introduction

AMERICAN BOBTAIL

Accepted for Championship in TICA in May 2002

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best American Bobtail of the Year
Best American Bobtail of the Year
RW DGC Magicbobs Double Trouble
Brown (Black) Classic Tabby
Best American Bobtail Kitten of the Year
Best American Bobtail Kitten of the Year
Magicbobs Bewitched
Blue Silver Classic Tabby
Best American Bobtail Alter of the Year
Best American Bobtail Alter of the Year
RW SGCA Attitudeacres Missy Mountain
Brown (Black) Spotted Tabby

General Description

Reminiscent of the wild cats, the American Bobtail is a medium-large to large, naturally occurring short-tailed cat, native to North America. It is a well-muscled, solid cat with the power and grace of an athlete. It has the gaze of the hunter and the rolling gait that, along with its naturally bobbed tail, give it the resemblance to the wild cats but with the loving affection and intelligence of the domestic cat. No two tails are identical so they are truly the hallmark of the individual and are proudly held above the back when the cat is alert, often wagging to express the cat's mood. Developed by nature to survive in its native environment, the American Bobtail has above average intelligence and is a breed of moderation rather than extremes taking up to 3 years to reach full maturity.

History

Although the Bobtail has been in America for many generations, the true development of the breed began in the late 1960's. Every breeder of the American Bobtail has heard the story of Yodi, the patriarch of the breed. John and Brenda Sanders, a young couple, were vacationing in the southwest. They were driving through an Indian Reservation in Arizona when they discovered a brown tabby kitten with a short tail and decided to take their new pet home to Iowa. When Yodi became of age, he romanced the couple's female cat, Mishi, a non-pedigreed domestic color point. The resulting kittens inherited Yodi's unusual short tail. The kittens soon caught the eye of family friends, Mindy Shultz and Charlotte Bentley, who saw the possibility of a new breed of felines. Using several of these bobtailed kittens and outcrossing to a longhaired color point, they produced the first true American Bobtails.

In 1989, TICA recognized the American Bobtail as a naturally occurring breed of cat. The foundation stock of this breed comes from feral cats possessing a natural short tail from different regions of the United States and Canada. Most breeders no longer use feral bobtailed cats in their breeding programs.

Personality

The American Bobtail is a great family pet who attaches itself to the whole family, not just one person. The breed gets along with children as well as other pets, including the family dog. They want to be with the family rather than being alone. They have a subtle personality which is affectionate and loving rather than demanding or in your face. Most are moderately active without being either a "couch potato" or a "perpetual motion" machine. They can easily be taught to "walk" on a leash and play fetch.

Traits

The American Bobtail comes in any color and pattern. This means that they can be any pattern in black, brown, chocolate, cinnamon, blue, lilac, fawn, red, and cream, with or without white. This wonderful variety of colors and patterns comes in two (2) hair lengths: short and medium-long. The short hair is plush and reminds people of a rabbit pelt. The longer one is easy to keep with minimal combing.

The weight of males usually ranges between 12-16 lbs while females are 7-11 lbs. The weight should come from the cat being well-muscled and having substantial, large boning, rather than being overweight.

One of the most unusual traits is the cat's shortened tail. The desired length of the tail should be a minimum one inch and a maximum not longer than the hock. The tail mutation gene is not a controllable gene resulting in the different tail lengths of each kitten in the litter.

Friday, 30 May 2014 12:00

Abyssinian-Introduction

ABYSSINIAN

Accepted for Championship in TICA in June 1979

2016 - 2017
Best of Breed

(Click to enlarge)
Best Abyssinian of the Year
Best Abyssinian of the Year
IW SGC Mysticoaws Magical Storm
Ruddy Ticked Tabby
Best Abyssinian Kitten of the Year
Best Abyssinian Kitten of the Year
Blueriver Copy Cat
Ruddy Ticked Tabby
Best Abyssinian Alter of the Year
Best Abyssinian Alter of the Year
IW SGCA Anubis Maserati of Khamsin/CF
Cinnamon Ticked Tabby

General Description

Abyssinians look like a small mountain lion or cougar with almond eyes set in a dramatically marked expressive face and a spectacularly warmly ticked coat that produces a shimmering iridescence whether still or in motion. They are athletic, alert and very active. Even though they are well-muscled their movement is lithe, graceful and very quick. Their carriage is confident and regal, but their antics have caused some to call them "Aby-silly-ans"! The Somali is simply and beautifully a semi-long-haired Abyssinian. It has the same expressive face but with a shaggy ticked coat, ear tufts and a fox-like tail. The Abyssinians and Somalis are also known as the 'preposition' cats because they leave no niche unexplored; they are above, below, in, under, across, beside, between, into, over, among and through everywhere! Perhaps alliteration is an easier way to describe the Abyssinian and Somali: active, awesome, agile, astounding, alert, animated, affectionate, amusing, athletic, astute, amiable and attentive.

History

The Abyssinian is one of the oldest breeds of domesticated cats, but its real ancestry is lost in time. Romantic tales call it the cat from the Blue Nile saying it is a direct descendant of the sacred cat of Ancient Egypt because it resembles the cats depicted in Egyptian murals and artifacts. Others believe British soldiers from Abyssinia (now Ethiopia) brought a cat named Zula home with them to England at the end of the Abyssinian war in 1868. So far, no documentation links Zula to the cats of today and recent genetic studies identify the cats in the coastal area of the Bay of Bengal in India as the Abyssinian's potential forebears.

The Abyssinian was developed and refined in Britain. The first Abyssinian arrived in the United States in the early 1900s and they were first exhibited in 1909. In the 1930s an effort to develop the Abyssinian in the US began and it quickly developed into one of America's favorite breeds because of its expressive eyes, unique coat pattern and personality. The Somali is the stunning long-haired descendant of the Abyssinian and is named for Somalia which borders Ethiopia, formerly Abyssinia, to represent their connection to each other.

 

Personality

Abyssinians and Somalis are loyal, affectionate, highly intelligent and very interactive with their owners and environment. No place ever goes unexplored and yet seldom do they knock anything off of a shelf or countertop. They are wonderful companions who are highly interested in everything around them and what everybody is doing. They like a good view of their surroundings, so expect them to find them atop the refrigerator, doors and bookcases. They are entertained by whatever moves outside making bird feeders visible through a window a must. Saying they show an intense curiosity in all that surrounds them is an understatement.

Not usually considered a lap cat due to their high energy and curiosity levels, Abys/Somalis do occasionally make visits to your lap or find a way under the covers to spend time near their beloved owners. The way they transform within seconds from a radiant and regal presence into an amazingly playful character with childlike antics and an indomitable spirit is astounding. Engaging companions for people of all ages, they are happiest in the company of others, love to play and will find ways to involve you in their activities. While exceedingly social, they are not always content in large cat populations where they have to share attention.

Traits

The Abyssinian is a short-haired cat whose coat has an iridescent warmth of color produced by the Agouti ticking, where each shaft of hair has 4-6 bands of alternating rich color similar to that of a bunny coat. The coat is resilient and when rubbed against the lay of the coat it snaps back into place. Similarly colored, the Somali is semi-long-haired with a coat that is very soft and finely textured. Coat texture for both is generally soft, but varies somewhat with different colors because the pigment particles have different shapes and distribution within the hair shaft causing the textural variation.

The Aby/Somali head type is a modified wedge with rounded contours. In profile, there is a rise from the bridge of the nose to the forehead with a brow ridge that helps establish the wild appearance to the face. The ears are large and arched forward in alertness not to miss out on anything. The eyes are large, almond-shaped jewels, expressive and richly colored gold, amber or green surrounded by a ring of dark color (eyeliner) that is then surrounded by a lighter color. The muzzle is rounded in contour without being pointy or pinched in appearance.

They are a medium sized cat with males weighing 8-10 pounds and females 6-7 pounds. The body is medium long, lithe and graceful with the muscular strength of a fine-motor skilled athlete. The Aby/Somali is solidly built with a level flank and a slight arch to the back that is more noticeable when the cat is sitting. The legs are slim, long and well-muscled with oval-shaped feet and an appearance of standing on tip-toes.

Abys and Somalis are bred in the following colors: Ruddy, Chocolate, Cinnamon, Blue, Lilac and Fawn and the silver version of these colors where an icy white coloration closest to the skin is followed by ticking up the hair shaft.

Tuesday, 20 May 2014 06:00

TICA - Recognized cat breeds

TICA - Recognized cat breeds

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Meet Our Fabulous Felines

As the world's largest genetic registry of pedigreed cats, TICA currently recognizes 71 breeds of cats for championship competition. In addition, the number of breeds can change as new breeds are developed. 

The different breeds are eligible to compete in TICA sanctioned shows and for appropriate titles and awards, based on their status. To learn about TICA's Best of Breed winners for the past years select the show season you would like to know about: 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008.

To learn more about each breed recognized by TICA, select the breed(s) you're interested in and read their breed profile. It's also good to talk to a breeder at your local show and see an example of the breed(s) you're interested in learning more about before you take one home.

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Championship Breeds
Breeds of cats who have been accepted for championship and are recognized as being eligible to compete in TICA sanctioned shows and eligible for appropriate titles and/or computation of Annual Awards. These cats must be 8 months of age or more and may be male, female, neuter or spay. Pedigreed kittens (under 8 months of age) do not earn titles, but are eligible to compete in TICA sanctioned shows and may earn points towards Annual Awards.
Photo by Helmi
Abyssinian
Photo by Helmi
American Bobtail
Photo by Helmi
American Bobtail SH
Photo by Tatiana Amosova
American Curl
Photo by Helmi
American Curl LH
Photo by Helmi
American Shorthair
Photo by Helmi
American Wirehair
Photo by Helmi
Australian Mist
Photo by Helmi
Balinese
Photo by Helmi
Bengal

Bengal Longhair
Photo by Helmi
Birman
Photo by Helmi
Bombay
Photo by Helmi
British Longhair
Photo by Helmi
British Shorthair
Photo by Helmi
Burmese
Photo by Helmi
Burmilla
Photo by Helmi
Burmilla Longhair
Photo by Helmi
Chartreux
Photo by Diana Starr, Starrlight Photography
Chausie
Photo by Helmi
Cornish Rex
Photo by Helmi
Cymric
Photo by Helmi
Devon Rex
Photo by Evelyn Jacobs
Donskoy
Photo by Helmi
Egyptian Mau
Photo by Helmi
Exotic Shorthair
Photo by Helmi
Havana
Photo by Helmi
Himalayan
Photo by Helmi
Japanese Bobtail
Photo by Helmi
Japanese Bobtail LH
Photo by Helmi
Khaomanee
Photo by Preston
Korat
Photo by Helmi
Kurilian Bobtail
Photo by Helmi
Kurilian Bobtail LH
Photo by Helmi
LaPerm
Photo by Helmi
LaPerm Shorthair
Photo by Helmi
Lykoi
Photo by Helmi
Maine Coon
Photo by Helmi
Maine Coon Polydactyl
Photo by Helmi
Manx
Photo by Audra Mitchell
Minuet
Photo
Minuet Longhair
Photo by Helmi
Munchkin
Photo by Helmi
Munchkin Longhair

Nebelung
Photo by Helmi
Norwegian Forest
Photo by Helmi
Ocicat

Oriental Longhair

Oriental Shorthair
Photo by Helmi
Persian
Photo by Helmi
Peterbald

Pixiebob

Pixiebob Longhair
Photo by Helmi
Ragdoll
Photo by Helmi
Russian Blue
Photo by Helmi
Savannah
Photo by Helmi
Scottish Fold
Photo by Helmi
Scottish Fold LH
Photo by Helmi
Scottish Straight
Photo by Helmi
Scottish Straight LH
Photo by Jim Brown
Selkirk Rex
Photo by Helmi
Selkirk Rex LH
Photo by Helmi
Siamese

Siberian
Photo by Helmi
Singapura
Photo by Helmi
Snowshoe
Photo by Helmi
Somali
Photo by Helmi
Sphynx
Photo by Helmi
Thai
Photo by Helmi
Tonkinese
Photo by Helmi
Toyger
Photo by Helmi
Turkish Angora
Photo by Helmi
Turkish Van
Non Championship Breeds

This class consists of Household Pets and Household Pet Kittens. Household pets earn titles comparable to Championship cats and are eligible to compete in TICA sanctioned shows and may earn points towards Annual Awards. Household pet kittens do not earn titles, but are eligible to compete in TICA sanctioned shows and may earn points towards Annual Awards.

Photo by Helmi
Household Pet
Photo by Helmi
Household Pet Kitten
Advanced New Breeds
The second level of the Championship Advancement Class Program. These breeds are eligible to be shown in TICA sanctioned shows but do not earn titles or points towards Annual Awards and must follow specific rules to be eligible for championship status.
Photo by Helmi
Highlander
Photo by Helmi
Highlander SH
Photo by Helmi
Serengeti
Preliminary New Breeds
The beginning level of the Championship Advancement Class Program. These breeds are eligible to be shown in TICA sanctioned shows but do not earn titles or points towards Annual Awards and must follow specific rules to be eligible for the next step in achieving championship status.
Photo by Jim Child
Minskin
Monday, 26 May 2014 12:00

TICA Online Breeders

TICA online breeders

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TICA Logo

The breeders below are all members of TICA's Online Breeders. When you visit their cattery website, look for the TICA Online Breeders logo. The breeders you find listed here are all TICA members. Since we are a large association, we do not have the resources to visit each of the listed catteries.

See your cattery listed here or renew your current listing! Find out how.

Have you registered your cattery name? Check if it is available!

TICA offers breeders the opportunity to promote their cattery to thousands of members worldwide in addition to thousands of exhibitors on every continent and cat lovers around the world! View our Advertising Opportunities

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Download our Brochures (PDF)
Championship Breeds
Photo by Helmi
Abyssinian
Photo by Helmi
American Bobtail
Photo by Helmi
American Bobtail SH
Photo by Tatiana Amosova
American Curl
Photo by Helmi
American Curl LH
Photo by Helmi
American Shorthair
Photo by Helmi
American Wirehair
Photo by Helmi
Australian Mist
Photo by Helmi
Balinese
Photo by Helmi
Bengal

Bengal Longhair
Photo by Helmi
Birman
Photo by Helmi
Bombay
Photo by Helmi
British Longhair
Photo by Helmi
British Shorthair
Photo by Helmi
Burmese
Photo by Helmi
Burmilla
Photo by Helmi
Burmilla Longhair
Photo by Helmi
Chartreux
Photo by Diana Starr, Starrlight Photography
Chausie
Photo by Helmi
Cornish Rex
Photo by Helmi
Cymric
Photo by Helmi
Devon Rex
Photo by Evelyn Jacobs
Donskoy
Photo by Helmi
Egyptian Mau
Photo by Helmi
Exotic Shorthair
Photo by Helmi
Havana
Photo by Helmi
Himalayan
Photo by Helmi
Japanese Bobtail
Photo by Helmi
Japanese Bobtail LH
Photo by Helmi
Khaomanee
Photo by Preston
Korat
Photo by Helmi
Kurilian Bobtail
Photo by Helmi
Kurilian Bobtail LH
Photo by Helmi
LaPerm
Photo by Helmi
LaPerm Shorthair
Photo by Helmi
Lykoi
Photo by Helmi
Maine Coon
Photo by Helmi
Maine Coon Polydactyl
Photo by Helmi
Manx
Photo by Audra Mitchell
Minuet
Photo
Minuet Longhair
Photo by Helmi
Munchkin
Photo by Helmi
Munchkin Longhair

Nebelung
Photo by Helmi
Norwegian Forest
Photo by Helmi
Ocicat

Oriental Longhair

Oriental Shorthair
Photo by Helmi
Persian
Photo by Helmi
Peterbald

Pixiebob

Pixiebob Longhair
Photo by Helmi
Ragdoll
Photo by Helmi
Russian Blue
Photo by Helmi
Savannah
Photo by Helmi
Scottish Fold
Photo by Helmi
Scottish Fold LH
Photo by Helmi
Scottish Straight
Photo by Helmi
Scottish Straight LH
Photo by Jim Brown
Selkirk Rex
Photo by Helmi
Selkirk Rex LH
Photo by Helmi
Siamese

Siberian
Photo by Helmi
Singapura
Photo by Helmi
Snowshoe
Photo by Helmi
Somali
Photo by Helmi
Sphynx
Photo by Helmi
Thai
Photo by Helmi
Tonkinese
Photo by Helmi
Toyger
Photo by Helmi
Turkish Angora
Photo by Helmi
Turkish Van
Advanced New Breeds
Photo by Helmi
Highlander
Photo by Helmi
Highlander SH
Photo by Helmi
Serengeti
Saturday, 24 May 2014 06:00

Complaints

FAQ

Complaints

Q; How do I file a complaint or response with TICA?
A: It is your obligation to be familiar with the TICA rules regarding complaints and disciplinary actions prior to submitting a complaint or response. Complaint forms are available from the TICA office or on our website at complaint form. Neither the TICA office or the legal committee can assist you in determining what information or documentation to submit in support of a complaint or response.

 

Q: Is there a fee for filing a complaint or response with TICA?
A: The fee for filing a complaint is $75.00, plus $2.00 for each page over 10 pages. The response fee is zero for up to 10 pages, plus $5.00 for each page over 10 pages. You may not reduce pages or text to reduce the number of pages you submit.

 

Q: My complaint is regarding a TICA judge. How would such a complaint be handled?
A: You may file either a formal or informal complaint against a judge. An informal complaint may be sent directly to the Judging Administrator. There is no filing fee for such a complaint and TICA will take no direct action based upon a informal complaint. However, this information is placed in the judge's file and is reviewed when the judge seeks advancement. A formal complaint may be filed against a judge using the general complaint guidelines and by paying the appropriate fee. Such a complaint is handled as provided in this FAQ.

 

Q: What is the proper format for a complaint or response?
A: Your complaint or response, and all attachments, must be submitted on 8 1/2 x 11 paper (or standard size paper for those from outside North America), single sided. No post-its, small pieces of paper, or other under or oversized attachments are allowed. The text must be clearly legible. Your complaint must contain the specific TICA rules that you contend were violated.

Any supporting documentation and information must comply with the applicable rules. Any person providing supporting documentation that is not a party must be identified by full name, address and telephone number. The location of the originals of any documents submitted must be provided. Government records submitted by complaining parties must be certified.

 

Q: TICA rules require sworn statements. How should those statements best be submitted?
All supporting declarations, as well as the complaint, should be sworn before a notary public or the equivalent.

 

Q: Can I submit further information or documents later?
A: You should submit all the pertinent information with your complaint or response. Please do not submit supplemental documentation or information after you have filed your complaint or response, as it will not be considered.

 

Q: Can I telephone or email the office or the legal committee regarding my complaint?
A: If you have filed or received a complaint, please obtain consent for email communications with Legal Counsel by contacting This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Please do not contact Legal Counsel by email to "file reports" about breeders, you will need to file a formal complaint.

 

Q: What is the status of my complaint?
A: Neither the TICA office or the legal committee provides status reports of any kind regarding pending complaints. If you have received a receipt from the TICA office for your filing fee, your complaint is being processed.

Phone: (+1) (956) 428.8046
Email:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Fax: (+1) (956) 428.8047

THE INTERNATIONAL CAT ASSOCIATION
P.O. Box 2684, Harlingen, Texas 78551

 

Q: When will I know the outcome of my complaint?
A: If your complaint was filed less than 120 days prior to a meeting of the board of directors (held 2 times a year - in May and the week before Labor Day), it is likely that your complaint will not be reviewed at that meeting, but at the following meeting. You may expect information of the initial action taken on your complaint approximately four to six weeks following the board meeting at which your complaint is reviewed.

 

Q: What action will be taken on my complaint?
A: Each complaint is reviewed individually, and therefore it is impossible to indicate what the outcome will be until that complaint is reviewed. Generally, TICA does not take any action on disputes between breeders or get involved in any sort of contractual disputes. However, if a written agreement provides that a TICA registration will be provided with a pet cat, generally the breeder is expected to comply with that agreement.

If you have a dispute with a breeder, some breeds have breed-specific organizations which may deal with those types of disputes, for example, MCBFA (the Maine Coon Breeders and Fanciers Association) and TIBS (The International Bengal Society).

The initial action taken by the board of the directors is usually either no action, at which point the complaint is closed, or the matter is set for hearing at the next board meeting. However, other action can be taken at the initial review.

Please note, TICA does not take "reports" on health issues.

Generally, TICA does not take any action on health issues. This is generally more suitable for a civil action.

 

Q: Did TICA receive a response to my complaint?
A: If a response to your complaint is received, a copy will be forwarded to you.

 

Q: A response to my complaint was received; can I submit further information or documents?
A: Please do not submit a rebuttal to that response without a request by the legal committee that you do so.

 

Q: Can I provide information or documentation that will not be disclosed to the other party to the complaint?
A: Information provided in complaints and responses is not confidential; the entire complaint is forwarded to the responding party, and the entire response is forwarded to the complaining party.

 

Q: I have filed a complaint with TICA. Can I distribute that information?
A: TICA cannot generally control statements made by individuals. However, TICA does not consider that it is in the best interest of TICA, the cat fancy as a whole, or to be to the benefit of cats in any way for complaints or allegations against TICA members, exhibitors or breeders to be posted to email lists or otherwise distributed.

 

Q: I do not live in the United States and I received a copy of the Complaint, only several days before a response was due:
A: Upon receipt, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and provide info regarding the date you received the complaint. A new date for your response will be set.

Sunday, 25 May 2014 12:00

Judging

FAQ

Judging

How are cats judged?
There are several classifications that cats are judged in. They include Championship cats, kittens and alters. There are also classes for Household Pets, Household Pet kittens and the newly developing breeds. Each cat or kitten is judged by their breed standard. This is a written standard of perfection for that particular breed. You can see each breed's standard on its individual breed . There are specialty rings and allbreed rings. Specialty rings will have only longhair cats judged together and the shorthair cats judged with only shorthair cats. An allbreed ring will have shorthair and longhair cats judged together and against one another. In either type ring, after the best of breed is selected, the judge will call a final which has the top ten cats, kittens or alters vying for the Best in their classification. You can learn more about judging by downloading the Spectators Guide.


How do I contact the Judging Administrator?
The judging administrators email is: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Saturday, 24 May 2014 12:00

Shows and Scoring

FAQ

Shows & Scoring Questions

Q: How do I find out if all of my cat's shows have been scored?
A: EmailThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and request a CSR (Current Scoring Record).
Provide the cat's name and registration number.
The fee is $5.00 (US) per report.
This report will show the points earned in each ring at each show.
You must be the registered owner of the cat in order to request a CSR.

 

Q: How many points does my cat have?
A: The Executive Office will not provide the total points on cat's standings for regional and international awards by phone.

You can find this information by browsing through every category listed on:
www.ticamembers.org/estimated_standings

You may request a CSR (Current Scoring Record) by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Provide the cat's name and registration number.
The fee is $5.00 (US) per report.
This report will show the points earned in each ring at each show.
You must be the registered owner of the cat in order to request a CSR.

 

Q: I can't find my cat in the current standings.
A: First, browse through every category listed on: www.ticamembers.org/estimated_standings If you cannot find your cat, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and request a CSR (Current Scoring Record).

Provide the cat's name and registration number.
The fee is $5.00 (US) per report.
This report will show the points earned in each ring at each show.
You must be the registered owner of the cat in order to request a CSR.

 

Q: I sent in a confirmation, why isn't my cat scored?
A: Titles are different from scoring (different department). If you submit an application for recognition of wins and do not specify that your cat was shown pending or with a wrong registration number, the confirmation department will not notify the scoring department

The TICA Standing rules state:

601.1 Unregistered Cats. Unregistered cats may be shown only once in TICA without a registration number. All points and/or wins for Annual Awards acquired by an unregistered cat in the second and/or subsequent shows shall be irrevocably lost. The exhibitor is obligated to furnish the registration number to the entry clerk or master clerk and the Executive Office. In order to obtain credit for any points and/or wins received at the first show where the cat, kitten, alter, household pet adult or household pet kitten was shown as unregistered, the owner must notify the Executive Office in writing requesting the first show to be credited and stating the name, date and location of the show, and the name of cat, breed (if applicable), registration number, and entry number.

 

Q: My cat is being shown under a different color than what is currently registered.
A: According to TICA Standing Rule: 901.2 Color Awards.

In order to receive a color award, cats must be registered in the correct color (color in which they were shown) by May 7th.

Return the original registration certificate to the Executive Office, along with a $7.00 correction fee. (Please specify the correct color)

In TICA, cats are registered genetically and shown phenotypically. Therefore, if your cat shown looks different from its genetic color, you must inform the Executive Office to receive a color award.

 

Q: The registration number printed in the catalog is incorrect.
A: Email the Executive Office with the correct registration number. Provide a list of all shows to include the name and date for any needed corrections.

 

Q: The show results posted on the website are not correct.
A: These show reports are compiled by volunteer show reporters on the TICA mailing list. These show reports are not an official publication of The International Cat Association. The show results in this archive are compiled from marked catalogs that have not been verified by the TICA Executive Office and, as such, may not be construed as official results. Official scoring is done in the TICA Executive Office, independently of these reports.

 

Q: This was my second time I showed my cat without a registration number.
A: According to TICA Standing Rule: 601.1

Unregistered cats may be shown only once in TICA without a registration number. All points and/or wins for titles and/or Annual Awards acquired by an unregistered cat in the second and/or subsequent shows shall be irrevocably lost. The exhibitor is obligated to furnish the registration number to the entry clerk or master clerk and the Executive Office. In order to obtain credit for any points and/or wins received at the first show where the cat, kitten alter or household pet adult was shown as unregistered, the owner must notify the Executive Office in writing requesting the first show to be credited and stating the name, date and location of the show, and the name, breed (if applicable), registration number, and entry number.

 

Q: What do I do if I showed my cat pending?
A: According to TICA Standing Rule: 601.1 Unregistered Cats.

Unregistered cats may be shown only once in TICA without a registration number. All points and/or wins for titles and/or Annual Awards acquired by an unregistered cat in the second and/or subsequent shows shall be irrevocably lost. The exhibitor is obligated to furnish the registration number to the entry clerk or master clerk and the Executive Office. In order to obtain credit for any points and/or wins received at the first show where the cat, kitten alter or household pet adult was shown as unregistered, the owner must notify the Executive Office in writing requesting the first show to be credited and stating the name, date and location of the show, and the name, breed (if applicable), registration number, and entry number.

A written request can be submitted by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Q: What region is my cat being scored in?
A: According to the following TICA Standing Rules:
601.2.8 Cats will be scored in the region of residence on January First.
601.2.9 Kittens will be scored in the region where they were first shown unless the Executive Office is notified in writing.
601.2.10 If a cat or kitten completed its show career before January 1st, it will be scored in the region where it completed that career.
601.2.11 For purposes of scoring, the transfer date on a Certificate of Registration is the date the transfer is received in the Executive Office. In order for the new owner to be shown on the awards, the transfer must be received in the Executive Office by January 1st; if the cat was shown only after the transfer then the transfer must be received in the Executive Office by May 7th. If the cat was shown only before the transfer then the old owner(s) will be furnished the award. There is no primary owner. Co-owners are equal owners of the cat. We score the cat in the region shown in the catalog. If different regions show up in different catalogs, first we check to make sure that one of the owners is from that region and then we change it. If we are informed at any rime, where the cat resides, we make a note of that. When the regional lists go to the regional directors, they are usually very aware of where the cat should be scored and if the two directors concur, the cat can be changed at that time.

 

Q: When are the standings updated?
A: The output of standings varies depending on the workload.

 

Q: Where can I find which shows are included in the current standings?
A: The shows included in the current TICA standings are listed at www.tica.org/pdf/standings/stand_show.pdf.

 

Q: How are cats judged?
A: There are several classifications that cats are judged in. They include Championship cats, kittens and alters. There are also classes for Household Pets, Household Pet kittens and the newly developing breeds. Each cat or kitten is judged by their breed standard. This is a written standard of perfection for that particular breed. You can see each breed's standard on its individual breed . There are specialty rings and allbreed rings. Specialty rings will have only longhair cats judged together and the shorthair cats judged with only shorthair cats. An allbreed ring will have shorthair and longhair cats judged together and against one another. In either type ring, after the best of breed is selected, the judge will call a final which has the top ten cats, kittens or alters vying for the Best in their classification. You can learn more about judging by downloading the Spectators Guide.

 

Q: How do I contact the Judging Administrator?
A: The judging administrators email is: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Saturday, 24 May 2014 12:00

Registration Questions

FAQ

Registration Questions

Q: What are the rules for filling out a Blueslip?
A: The rules are listed on the Blueslip itself, make sure that the Breeder gives you the instruction portion of the Blueslip.

 

Q: May I change the Blueslip?
A: No alterations may be made to the printed portion of this document. Corrections to the printed portion of this document must be submitted to the Executive Office in writing by the breeder, together with the original documents and the appropriate fees.

 

Q: What are the responsibility of the breeder?
A: The breeder(s) must enter information as to the sex, color, eye color, longhair (LH), shorthair (SH), standard (Std), non-standard (NStd). Std or NStd (Standard or Non-Standard) are terms for mutation breeds and may be used for whatever mutation exists for the breed being registered. The breeder's signature IS REQUIRED when the blocks "NOT FOR BREEDING" or "NOT FOR SHOWING" are marked. If this cat has been sold with the understanding that it will not be used for breeding or exhibition, ONLY the breeder may request any change. Requests for changes must be submitted to the Executive Office in writing.

 

Q: What are the responsibility of the new owner?
A: Owner(s):Type or print the name of the cat in the blocks under "FIRST NAME CHOICE" and "SECOND NAME CHOICE". Once at the Executive Office, if it is possible, the first name choice is used, if it is not possible to use the first name choice, then the second name choice is automatically used. The second name choice is not required to be filled in, however, if the first name choice is a duplicate or has a cattery name registered to someone else or for some reason(s) cannot be used, then the registration must be sent back for an additional name choice. Remainder to stay the same. Type or print the name of the owner(s), name of the cat and complete address, city, state/province, country, and zip/postal code.

Names of Cats: Cats may not be named after an ancestor without written permission of the owner of the ancestor; a letter attesting to such permission is to be filed with the Executive Office. See Registration Rules 39.8. Owner(s) may enter two choices for the name of the cat to be registered at the top of the form. The owner's name, address, and city are not allowed in the name of the cat unless it is a TICA registered cattery. The names of cats may not be changed in any manner after they have been registered, except for the correction of clerical errors in the Executive Office; the addition of a cattery name as provided in ARTICLE EIGHT, 38.7, 38.8, and 38.10 of the Registration Rules; to re-register as Household Pets, TICA registered championship class cats pursuant to Show Rule 3.12.a; or pursuant to the Registration Rules, ARTICLE IX, Section 39.5. Names of cats and catteries may not be duplicated.

Punctuation: Punctuation marks of any kind (‘, &, #, etc.) are not allowed in the name of the cat.

Suffixes: A cat's name, including cattery names and the word "of" may not exceed 35 letters/characters/spaces combined. When the name of the cat is longer than 35 letters/characters/spaces, the suffix will be automatically dropped.

Cattery Names: The prefix position in a cat's registered name is reserved for the breeder's TICA registered cattery name. The breeder's cattery names may NOT be removed. The breeder is ALWAYS the owner of the dam at the time of mating. The suffix position in a cat's registered name is reserved for the owner's TICA registered cattery name. The suffix follows the word "of" after the registered name of the cat, i.e., BLUEBELL STAR OF REDWILLOW; BLUEBELL is the breeder's TICA registered cattery name, STAR is the name of the cat, and REDWILLOW is the owner's TICA registered cattery name. Any use of the word "of" in any language may denote a cattery suffix, and foreign translations for the word "of" will not be allowed, i.e., av, de, etc. If the word following the word "of" is NOT a TICA registered cattery name, or is not the owner's TICA registered cattery name, it will be automatically dropped. The suffix may change with a transfer of ownership.

 

Q: How do I change the name of my cat?
A: The TICA Registration Rules state:
"39.4 The names of cats may not be changed in any manner after they have been registered, except:

39.4.1 The correction of clerical errors in the recorder's office.
39.4.2 The addition of a cattery name as provided in ARTICLE EIGHT, 38.7, 38.8, and 38.10.
39.4.3 To re-register as Household Pets, TICA registered championship class cats may be registered pursuant to Show Rule 23.7.2.
39.4.4 A name change may be requested provided the Executive Office receives the request for a name change within 45 days (60 days in remote areas) from the date of issue of the initial Registration Certificate and the request is accompanied by the original Registration Certificate and the designated fee, which fee shall be determined by the Board of Directors. The name change will be approved only if there has been no previous transaction recorded for the cat by the Executive Office (i.e., show wins, lease agreement, or any transaction processed in the original name of the cat)." The fee is $50.

 

Q: How do I get my cat transferred to my name?
A: To transfer a TICA registered cat, please submit the Certificate of Registration to the Executive Office with the signature of all owners on the reverse of the certificate and the name of the new owner filled out plus the fee.

 

Q: How do I register my cat if it is already registered in another association?
A: A 3-generation Certified pedigree from another association on the cat for which application is being made and a photocopy of a registration certificate from that association showing proof that the cat is owned by the person making the application and asking to be named the owner of the cat.

 

Q: How do I register my Household Pet (HHP)?
A: Fill out the HHP Registration Form. Owner's names are allowed in the cat's name. HHP's may only be registered as spay or neuter. HHP's may not use the name of a breed in the name. Only the owner's registered TICA cattery name may be suffix (follows the word "of"). Duplicate HHP names are allowed, but discouraged if possible. A HHP may not have a TICA registered cattery name in the prefix position.

 

Q: If I want to co-own my cat, what is the difference between "and" and "and/or" between the names of the co-owners?
A: The "slash" means either/or, so if you were signing a litter registration as the owner of the sire or dam, either owner could sign. The "and" means both, so on a litter, both owners would be required to sign as the owner of the sire or dam. This does not apply to transferring or leasing a cat. In the case of a transfer, ALL owners must sign on the reverse of the certificate. In the case of a lease, ALL owners must sign the lease form.

 

Q: What if I don't have a certified pedigree with which to register my cat?
A: A 3-generation pedigree, stating the color and pattern and the registering association's assigned registration number for each ancestor listed can be submitted. This pedigree must be signed by the breeder of the cat for which application is being made and must include a statement that this pedigree is true and correct to the best of the breeder's knowledge; the breeder must check mark NOT FOR BREEDING or NOT FOR SHOWING if those statements apply. In addition, a photocopy of a registration certificate from another association showing proof that the cat is owned by the person making the application and asking to be named the owner of the cat.

 

Q: Why can't I use my name or address in the name of my cat?
A: In the cat registry, when the same name is used on several cats STAR CHARLIE, STAR REGGIE, STAR FUNKY, or the reverse, it shows up in catalogs and in pedigrees and appears to be a TICA registered cattery. People are most likely to choose their name or address to use in this manner when they don't know how cattery names are used which is the reason for the Executive Office procedure not to allow it. If they choose to register their name or part of their address as a TICA cattery, we are happy to do so.

 

Q: Why did you add "/ID" to the end of my cat's name?
A: When a cat is registered from another association with a cattery name (prefix or suffix) that is a TICA registered cattery name that is not registered to the breeder/owner of the cat, we add "/ID" to denote that this is not the TICA registered owner of that cattery. When the cat's name is seen in a pedigree, there is at least some question as to the TICA registered owner of the cattery being the owner or the breeder of the cat.